How to Fight Cybercrime

Posted by Tobias Eichenseer Thu, 31 Jul 2014 11:52:00 GMT

Businesses and individuals are increasingly relying on computers and Internet-based networking. They experience several benefits, but also potential risks. When staff or business partners have constant access to internal networks from insecure locations, security is a major concern.

The Rise of Cybercrime
Cyberattacks generally refer to criminal activity involving the use of a computer network, normally conducted via the Internet. Internet users and organizations face increased risk of becoming targets of cyberattacks. An independent research report conducted by Ponemon Institute on organizations located in the United States in 2013 found that the U.S. experienced an increase of 18 percent in successful attacks from the previous year.
Today, criminals have more advanced technology and greater knowledge of cyber security. Attacks may include financial scams, computer hacking, virus attacks and distribution, denial-of-service, theft of an organization’s information assets, posting of sensitive business data on the Internet, and malware.

Risks of Cybercrime
For businesses and corporations, the cost associated with cyberattacks is large. Stolen or deleted corporate data can inflict financial damage on the victim, damage the company’s reputation, and negatively affect people’s livelihoods. The risks are even higher for small companies, since their businesses may rely solely on project files or customer data bases. The same Ponemon Institute study reported that in 2013, the average cost of cybercrime in the U.S. was $11.6 million annually - an increase in cost by 26 percent from the previous year.

Preventing Cyberattacks
Organizations should follow basic guidelines in order to reduce the security threat to their data and devices. To prevent cyberattacks, companies should:

1.    Use a Secure Connection to the Corporate Data
This generally involves implementing a Virtual Private Network (VPN). VPN technology provides protection for information that is being transmitted over the Internet by allowing users to form a virtual “tunnel” to securely enter an internal network to access resources, data and communications.

2.    Store Data Centrally
Centralized storage of data offers protection and increases speed, convenience and efficiency for accessing files. Sharing of files enables rapid and easy access to important data from virtually anywhere in the world. The relative mobility and control of data improves effectiveness of workflow. Another crucial advantage of centralized data is cost. Although it is possible to store and backup data on multiple machines, it is considerably more cost effective to use central storage. For instance, data can be stored on a server within the corporate LAN behind the firewall.

3.    Use Modern Authentication Methods
Authentication is the process by which the parties at either end of a network connection can verify the identity of the other party. Verification is typically based upon something you know (such as passwords), something you have (smart card or tokens), or something you are (biometric techniques, including fingerprint and eye scans). Deployment of modern authentication methods, such as Kerberos authentication protocol, ensures confidentiality through encryption that ensures no one can tamper with data in a Kerberos message. 

4.    Use Reliable, Strong Encryption Technology
Encryption is the process of changing information in a manner that cannot be deciphered by anyone except those holding special knowledge (generally referred to as a "key") that enables them to alter the information back to its original, readable form. A VPN turns the Internet (an unsecure environment) into a secure private network, by providing heavy encryption. In particular, an SSL VPN is best-suited for mobile apps. 
 
5.    Enforce Strong Passwords
Implementation of strong passwords is a basic security procedure, however it is often overlooked.  Complex, hard-to-crack passwords are a simple line of defense against a security breach. Password policies, which offer advice on proper password management, should be in place. Password best practices include:

•    Avoid using dictionary words or common sequences, such as numbers or letters in sequential order or repetitive numbers or letters.
•    Do not use personal information. 
•    Use special characters, such as * and #.  The majority of passwords are case sensitive, therefore, a mixture of both upper case and lower case letters, as well as numbers, should be used.
•    Choose a long password, as passwords become harder to crack with each added character.
•    Create different passwords for different accounts and applications. Therefore, if one password is breached, the security of other accounts is not at risk.
•    Never write down passwords and leave them unattended in a desk drawer or any other obvious place.
•    Never communicate a password by telephone, e-mail or instant messaging
•    Never disclose a password to others, including people who claim to be from customer service.
•    Change passwords whenever there is any doubt that a password may have been compromised.

Conclusion
The growing popularity and convenience of digital networks has led to an increase in cyberattacks; consequently, keeping up to date with the most recent and important concerns facing the organization is in itself a challenge. Organizations can protect their highly sensitive information by following a safety plan and adopting reasonable security practices.
 
If you would like to learn more about VPN technology, and review some tips on critical security aspects, download our free e-book: How Do I Find the Best VPN Solution for My Company?
 

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Why IT Controls are Vital for Your Business

Posted by Tobias Eichenseer Tue, 29 Jul 2014 12:32:00 GMT

Controls are a mode of living. Whether it’s the workplace that requires a key fob or an identification badge, a password to log into the company network, or an access permission to use a copier, there are numerous controls/safeguards that we encounter during the normal course of our everyday lives. 

Defining Control Activities
Control activities are actions taken to minimize risk. A risk is the probability of an event or action having adverse consequences on an organization, such as information assets that are not adequately safeguarded against loss.
Control activities occur throughout the organization and include diverse activities, including approvals, authorizations, verifications, reviews of operating performance, and security of assets.

Internal controls
Internal controls are a fundamental part of any organization’s financial and business policies and procedures. The advantages of internal controls are:

  • Prevention of errors and irregularities; if these do occur, the inaccuracies will be detected in a timely method
  • Protection of employees from being accused of misappropriations, errors or irregularities by clearly outlining responsibilities and tasks

IT Controls
IT controls are a subdivision of internal controls, and refer to policies, procedures and techniques on computer-based systems. IT controls are essential to protect assets, highly sensitive information and customers. IT controls support business management and governance; they also offer general and technical controls over IT infrastructures.

Subdivisions of IT Controls
Generally, IT controls are divided into two main categories:

1.    General Controls
These apply to all system components, processes and data for a specific organization. General control activities are conducted within the IT organization or the technology they support, which can be applied to each system that the organization depends upon. These controls facilitate confidentiality, integrity and availability, contribute to the safeguarding of data, and promote regulatory compliance. General controls make safe reliance on IT systems possible. Examples of such controls include access controls (physical security and logical access) and business continuity controls (disaster recovery and back-up).

2.    Application Controls
These controls are business process controls, and contribute to the efficiency of individual business processes or application systems. Examples of application controls include access authorization, which is essential for security of the corporate network. This prevents users from downloading illegal material or viruses, and may also block unproductive or inappropriate applications. Other examples of application controls include segregation of duties and concurrent update control.

Modern IT Solutions
Virtual private network (VPN) technology enables a secure connection to the organization’s data to be made over insecure connections, such as the Internet, and is essential to providing comprehensive security, safety and flexibility to businesses. Furthermore, advanced VPN technology offers several services which help users maintain access to critical information. VPNs facilitate the implementation of IT controls. For instance, VPNs provide dynamic access portals, whereby network managers can define server access with application publishing in such a way that the user only sees his or her personal, customized portal.

Conclusion

Control activities occur throughout the organization, and IT controls are fundamental to protect information assets and mitigate business risks. Deployment of a modern virtual private network (VPN) technology facilitates the implementation and management of IT controls.

If you would like to learn more about VPN technology, and review some helpful tips on critical security aspects, download our free e-book: How Do I Find the Best VPN Solution for My Company?

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5 Best Practices to Boost Remote Worker Productivity

Posted by Stefanie Kober Thu, 10 Jul 2014 10:44:00 GMT



Introduction:
Today, mobile workforces stay connected in and out of the office and use their devices for work and personal purposes. The ultimate goal of a remote working strategy is to increase productivity and reduce costs; indeed, studies by Best Buy, Dow Chemical and many others have proven that teleworkers are 35-40% more productive than their in-office counterparts.

The drafting and implementation of an organization-wide workplace strategy will ensure that end users at all levels of the organization will enjoy a positive experience. The following are five best practices that effectively boost remote workers’ productivity:

1. Maximize Employee Participation
Maximizing employee participation is the first step to maximizing employee productivity. Not all employees benefit equally from remote working; however, without a critical mass of users, the benefits will be limited. IT teams should not restrict solutions, such as mobile workplaces, to only those who “seem” to need it. Remote working allows employees to respond to colleagues and customers faster, therefore IT teams and managers should not deter employees from working anywhere and anytime.

2. Ensure Employees Have the Productivity Tools they Require

Employees should be encouraged to use a wide range of productivity tools which do not pose network security risks. However, if IT teams are uncertain how to handle such employee requests, they generally allow employees to use these tools without providing adequate security, or block the use of the tools entirely. Regardless of the circumstances, IT teams should circumvented security risks by deploying security solutions that allow employees to utilize tools without compromising the network security.

3. Free Use of Personal Apps and Services
Whether the device is personally owned or provided by the company, employees should be able to use their personal apps and services. Blocking an employee from storing their personal information with a cloud service provider is significantly different from ensuring corporate data does not end up in the public cloud. IT teams should focus on controlling data rather than controlling devices.

4. Offer Self-Service Support for Everyday Activities
There is a common notion that mobile devices will result in an increase in support costs – however this is a misconception. Conversely, if the IT teams provide a self-service capability, particularly for routine activities, it usually results in decreased in support costs. IT teams should stop short of supporting personal apps and services, but should invariably offer to assist with supporting business apps.

5. Support Wide Range of Devices
For the mobile workplace program to be widely adopted, the program should support a wide range of devices. Though challenges may arise, such as Android’s variability regarding support for on-device encryption and other enterprise-level security and management controls, the overall benefit is net positive.

The Future of Remote Working
The current trend towards remote working is expected to become even more prevalent in the future. With the right practices and controls in place, employee productivity can be maximized, without putting the security of the network at risk.

If you would like to learn about the advantages and limitations of mobile workplaces, and find out how to develop a strategy for mobile workplaces with the help of VPNs, please download our free eBook “Home Offices Made Easy”.

Author: Hazel Farrugia

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Explore how VPNs Help Provide Secure Mobile Workplaces with Our E-Paper

Posted by Sabrina Sturm Tue, 11 Jun 2013 11:33:00 GMT

As mobile working becomes the norm, enterprises must develop and implement strategies that account for the wide range of devices and operating systems that employees use to access company networks. While creating a mobile workplace strategy, enterprises must also consider that access to critical data on a local network requires detailed IT security systems.

A new HOB e-paper, “IT Security: How VPNs Help Provide Secure Mobile Workplaces” shows enterprises how to addresses these challenges and create smart mobile workplace strategies.

The e-paper is now available for FREE download on the HOB website.

It provides key considerations when choosing an appropriate VPN solution and reviews the various types of VPNs. The e-paper also addresses key security topics and answers burning questions regarding VPNs, including:

  • The Benefits and Downsides of Mobile Workplaces -- What are the most common risks that enterprises face and which best practices help overcome these obstacles?
  • Developing a Strategy for Mobile Workplaces -- What are the most essential and mission critical aspects of a mobile workplace strategy?
  • Technical Approach to a Successful Mobile Workplace Realization -- What benefits and weaknesses must IT teams consider before selecting and deploying the optimal VPN for their enterprise?
  • Creating Best Practices that Will Maximize Employee Productivity -- Which best practices are the most effective in maximizing employee productivity?
  • Avoiding the Security Pitfalls of a Mobile Workplace Deployment -- What pitfalls do IT teams need to be aware of so that corporate data stays secure?

Click here to download your free e-paper.

How will the e-paper help improve your mobile workplace strategy? Please share your feedback in the comments below! 

 

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Infographic: Where, When and How Do We Work in the Future?

Posted by Sabrina Sturm Tue, 03 Jul 2012 08:22:00 GMT

 

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